Safety Tips for Viewing this years Solar Eclipse!

SAFETY GLASSES MUST BE WORN AT ALL TIMES WHILE LOOKING AT THE SUN.
YOU MUST WEAR APPROVED EYE PROTECTION TO VIEW THE ECLIPSE.

Solar Eclipse Safety Tips

1. Looking at the sun for more than a couple seconds can cause significant permanent harm to our retinas and our eyesight.
2. Exposure to the ultraviolet light in the sun causes a chemical reaction in the cells of your retinas, killing photoreceptors and retinal cells.
3. Symptoms of eclipse damage are distortion and blur in your central vision, which can often be permanent.
4. During an eclipse, even if 99% of the sun is covered by the moon, the remaining light can still cause damage.
5. Eclipses are extra dangerous because they cause the visible light to be dim enough so you don’t feel the need to look away, despite the dangerous levels of invisible light affecting your eyes.

Proper vision protection must be worn at all times when looking at or near the sun during the whole eclipse.

 

6. The only recommended forms of eye protection are:
1. Approved Eclipse glasses, ISO 12312-2 rated
2. Welders glasses, #14
3. Even with this approved protection, never use binoculars or telescopes to look at the eclipse unless they have a special filter specifically rated for viewing the sun (be sure to check!)

*Regular sun glasses, polarized lenses, exposed film, smoked glass or any other ways of blocking light are  NOT CONSIDERED SAFE!*

7. Only if you are in the Zone of Totality, (which does not include Eugene or Springfield) is it safe to take off your glasses during Totality. When you see the sun coming around the moon, put your protection back on.
8. If you think you may have damaged your eyes from eclipse viewing: Do not go to the emergency room or urgent care. First wait a few days, as symptoms will often improve. If symptoms persist, please call your regular eye care provider for an evaluation.

With every eclipse, a handful of people lose some of their eyesight. Make sure that you don’t.

Safety Tips Courtesy of Peter Karth, MD